Archive for Pasadena Home Staging

Investor Home Staging – California Craftsman in Pasadena

I’m often asked how our Investor home staging differs from our “regular” home staging. The answer: it doesn’t. We still use the same high quality furniture, rugs, artwork and home staging accessories that we use for “regular” home staging. We are just as dedicated to helping our Investor home staging clients sell their homes as quickly as possible and for the most amount of money, as we are for our homeowner and real estate agent clients.

Here are some photos of a recent Investor home staging project – California Craftsman in Pasadena, CA.

Investor home staging Craftsman with red doorInvestor Staging Craftsman Living RoomInvestor Staging Master Bedroom blue and grayFamily Room Home Staging For InvestorsPhotos by Kevin Edge Real Estate Photography

This home has 3 bedrooms and 1.75 bathrooms in 1,836 sq. ft. It is located in North Pasadena on a quiet street lined with other charming Craftsman homes. The investor managed update without losing the original Craftsman charm. The gleaming hardwood floors flow from room to room making the space feel larger, lighter and brighter.

We often work on home staging projects for Investors. Many of our Investor clients use Moving Mountains Design for multiple staging projects per year. Some we work with on multiple projects per month. For more information about our Investor home staging services, please contact Michelle at (626)385-8852. For a free, no obligation estimate click here.

 

 

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Expert Home Staging Tips To Make A Small House Feel Big

18 Expert Home Staging Tips To Make A Small House Feel Bigger

I am frequently asked, by homeowners and real estate agents I work with, how to make their home or listing look bigger to appeal to more buyers. As an expert home stager in Pasadena and Los Angeles, one of my primary jobs is to make smaller homes feel more spacious.

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Here’s a list of 18 tips for making a small home feel bigger. You can use these tips whether you are staging a home to sell or if you are planning to stay, but just need some help dealing with smaller rooms. These tips will work with for vacant home staging (if you’re bringing in furniture) or occupied home stagomg (dealing with the client’s existing furniture):

  1. Pare down the furniture to the essentials. Do you really need a chair in the bedroom? Will the room appear larger with just the bed, the nightstands and maybe a dresser?
  2. Clutter makes a room feel smaller. Lots of smaller items, like a Hummel collection or bowling trophies displayed on every horizontal surface, eat up visual space. Only display 3-5 items at a time. Store, sell or pre-pack the rest. You’re selling a home, not a collection of “treasures”.
  3. Use fewer pieces of furniture. Its better to have one larger dresser than 2 smaller ones.
  4. Use appropriately sized furniture. Having a too big sofa in a small den will call attention to how small the room really is.
  5. Pull furniture away from the wall. That little bit of breathing room will give a sense of greater space.  Create a cozy sitting area in front of the fireplace, with room to move around the back of the furniture.
  6. Cooler colors recede, so painting an interior room a pale blue, green or gray will make it feel larger.
  7. Houses appear larger on the outside when painted a lighter color.
  8. Keep walkways and sight-lines clear. Don’t place furniture so that you are walking into the back of the sofa, or other large piece of furniture, when you walk into the room.
  9. Bedrooms feel larger if there is ample space to walk on either side of the bed. Not enough space? Get a smaller bed while you home is on the market. Downsize from a king to a queen or from a queen to a double, if necessary.
  10. Place the bed on the wall furthest from the door, if possible. The room will feel instantly larger.
  11. Show more hardwood. The larger the expanse of hardwood floor, the larger the room will appear. Do you really need that area rug? If the hardwood floors are hidden by wall to wall carpet, remove the carpet. The home will feel much more spacious.
  12. Try using one larger area rug instead of several smaller rugs. Or if the room looks OK without it, don’t use any area rugs.
  13. Patterned upholstery and drapes make a room feel smaller. Use fewer patterns on upholstery and bedding. Use a solid color blanket or bedspread on a bed in a small bedroom to make the room feel larger.
  14. Strategically placed mirrors make a room feel larger. Reflect a window or outdoor view, if possible. You can visually expand a space by putting a large mirror over a sofa.
  15. A well lit room feels larger. Get rid of those dark corners. Make sure every overhead light and table lamp is lit before open houses and showings.
  16. Minimize window treatments. The simpler the better. Shutters, blinds or simple drapes (no flounces, ruffles, strong patterns or complicated valences) take up less “visual space”.
  17. Make all your cabinets and closets half-empty. You will appear to have more closet and cabinet space. There is no such thing as a closet that is too empty when selling your home.
  18. Clean houses feel larger. Make sure every surface including your floors are shiny clean. Clean your windows and screens so they let in maximum light and sparkle.

Making a small home for sale feel larger

These home staging tips to make your home feel larger will work if you are staging to sell or staging to live.

If you need help figuring out how to make your home or listing feel larger, hire us for a home staging consultation. You’ll get some easy-to-implement expert home staging and interior design tips.  Its the best “bang for your buck” and it’s a great investment in preparing your home or listing for sale, or making your home more livable if you are planning to stay.

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Home Staging Nets Seller 1500% Return On Their Investment!

What’s the home staging return on investment?  A Pasadena home seller nets 1500% return on their home staging and home preparation investment!

For every dollar they invested preparing their home for sale, they netted $15 in the sale price of their home. Having invested approximately $20,000 in home staging and taking care of maintenance, painting and wall paper removal, these clients received $300,000 over their asking price.

Craig Maxwell: “Our Pasadena home was nice but a bit tired, and our agent arranged for Michelle to evaluate and stage our house. (We were lucky, because she is in great demand). In a two-hour walk-through, Michelle gave us a list of easy and relatively inexpensive fixes that made a huge improvement in the interior and exterior appearance. After two weeks the house looked amazing, and even more so after Michelle staged it. We had 20+ offers after the following weekend’s open house, and two weeks later we closed escrow at 25% above asking price – a 1,500% return on our investment in house preparation and staging. We couldn’t be more impressed and pleased with Michelle’s skill and professionalism. Her taste and understanding of what is important to buyers was a key to our successful home sale.”

In February, I was brought in by Irina Netchaev of Pasadena Views Real Estate Team for a home staging consultation on a new listing. As we went from room to room, the clients made notes as I explained everything they needed to do to get their home in top selling condition. The list included wall paper removal, painting, carpet cleaning, removal of some furniture, floor refinishing, as well as painting the front door and some curb appeal suggestions. These clients were very motivated, completed everything I suggested. Three weeks later they contacted me and told me they were ready to stage.

Here’s a press release:

Home Staging By Moving Mountains Design Nets Pasadena Home Sellers 1500% Return On Their Staging Investment

Pasadena home owners, Craig and Elaine Maxwell net $300,000 over asking price after home staging by Moving Mountains Design, a 1500% return on their staging investment.

Pasadena, CA (PRWEB) May 30, 2014

Pasadena home owners, Craig and Elaine Maxwell net $300,000 over asking price after staging by Moving Mountains Design, a 1500% return on their staging investment.

Michelle Minch, owner of Los Angeles home staging company, Moving Mountains Design, worked with Pasadena home sellers, Craig and Elaine Maxwell in early February to make their home market ready. A home staging consultation was performed by Minch at the request of Pasadena Real Estate Agent, Irina Netchaev, Pasadena Views Real Estate Team. During the home staging consultation, a list of repairs and recommendations was generated in order to maximize the selling price and speed of sale. The home staging consultation consisted of paint color recommendations, recommendation to remove wall paper and window treatments, floor refinishing and general condition issues. After completing all the work suggested the Maxwells called in Moving Mountains Design to stage. Staging took place during the first week of April. Less than 2 weeks later, after a bidding war resulted in multiple offers, the house went under contract, closing shortly after. The result? The house sold for 25% over list price – a 1500% profit on the staging and market ready home prep investment.

Craig Maxwell: “Our Pasadena home was nice but a bit tired, and our agent arranged for Michelle to evaluate and stage our house. (We were lucky, because she is in great demand). In a two-hour walk-through, Michelle gave us a list of easy and relatively inexpensive fixes that made a huge improvement in the interior and exterior appearance. After two weeks the house looked amazing, and even more so after Michelle staged it. We had 20+ offers after the following weekend’s open house, and two weeks later we closed escrow at 25% above asking price – a 1,500% return on our investment in house preparation and staging. We couldn’t be more impressed and pleased with Michelle’s skill and professionalism. Her taste and understanding of what is important to buyers was a key to our successful home sale.”

“While not every home seller will have the same results when working with a professional home stager, the Maxwells experienced such great success because they followed my instructions completely and hired a top-notch real estate agent. In this case, the cost of staging was a terrific investment which netted the sellers well over their asking price. Their house was market-ready and move-in-ready, a win for both the sellers and the buyer”, said Minch.

For more information about the benefits of home staging in Los Angeles, Pasadena and Arcadia, visit http://MovingMountainsDesign.com.

 Home Staging Nets Seller 1500% Return On Their Investment!

 

 

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Home Stagers Tips: How To Remove Smoking Odors From Your Home

Today I went to an open house in my Pasadena neighborhood for a condo unit that’s for sale. The condo is in a great neighborhood, in a quiet, well kept condo development. I was impressed with the walk up to the unit so extra points for good exterior appeal.  I opened the front door and WHAM! The smell of old cigarette smoke and nicotine hit me square in the face. I asked the agent if the owners were smokers. She said they were, and the apartment had been fully re-painted and re-carpeted, yet the smell persisted.

Smoking odors, be it from cigarettes, cigars, or pipes is insidious and very difficult to get rid of. It seeps into the smallest cracks and crevices. It saturates upholstery batting, stuffing and cushions. It infiltrates carpet padding. Here’s some home stager’s tips for getting rid of old cigarette smoke and nicotine smells:
Home stagers tip: Getting rid of cigarette smoke odors

  • Get rid of everything “soft” meaning furniture, upholstery, throw pillows, drapery, mattresses, etc. If you can’t put it in the washing machine or send it to the dry cleaner, you’ll never get rid of the smell. Even if you can wash a pillow cover, you will have to get rid of the pillow filler unless you can launder that too.
  • Tear out the carpet and tear out the carpet padding. Don’t replace the carpet without replacing the padding. Wash the bare floor with a product appropriate for the surface. Wash it again.
  • Wash down all painted surfaces with something like TSP which you can purchase at most hardware and paint stores. Don’t forget the ceiling. Follow the instructions on the package carefully so you don’t damage the surface or hurt yourself.
  • Wash all other hard surfaces (linoleum floors, tile, etc.) with a 1 to 3 solution of white vinegar and water (1 cup vinegar to 3 cups water). Test the solution in an inconspicuous area first to make sure it won’t damage the surface. DO NOT use this solution on granite, marble or stone. Use a reputable stone cleaner. Change the solution often so you are not dragging the smell from one surface to another. The vinegar smell will dissipate fairly rapidly, so don’t worry about that. Remember to wash out all cabinets and closets as well.
  • Use the correct Kilz primer to cover all painted surfaces. Your painter or paint store person should be able to direct you to the proper product. If the smell is particularly strong, you may have to use 2 coats of Kilz. Kilz claims to act like a sealer for both the nicotine stains and the odor.
  • Have all the vents and ducts in the house cleaned.
  • Change any HVAC filters (heater and AC).
  • Remove all lightbulbs and either clean them or replace them. Nicotine can collect on light bulbs like every place else, and when a bulb is turned on, it can act like an odor diffuser.

Most air fresheners will only mask the smell temporarily. Same with diffusers.

Please DO NOT USE an “ozone air purifiers” to remove smoking odors. According to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) a government agency, their claims are based upon junk science. Read more about ozone air cleaners or purifiers.

From the EPA site:

Manufacturers and vendors of ozone devices often use misleading terms to describe ozone. Terms such as “energized oxygen” or “pure air” suggest that ozone is a healthy kind of oxygen. Ozone is a toxic gas with vastly different chemical and toxicological properties from oxygen.

While there is no guarantee that the above methods will remove all smoke odors before you put your home on the market, they should go a long way to removing most of them.

This was originally posted in October 2010. It has been updated and more information has been added.

Photo credit: Nirbhao on Flickr.com

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