Archive for Home Staging Information

Homes Staged Before Listing Sell 90% Faster!

Staged homes, staged before listing, sell 90% faster, according to the most recent statistics released by the Real Estate Staging Association.

The Real Estate Staging Association, recently release their Home Staging Statistics Report, based on home staging statistics self-reported by professional home stagers nationally. Homes staged before listing sell 90% faster than homes listed on the MLS unstaged. Unstaged homes spent an average of 184 Days On Market (DOM). That’s more than 6 months! Yikes! Once those same homes were staged, they sold, on average, in 41 days. However, homes that were staged prior to listing sold, on average in 23 days!

Home staging works. Homes staged before listing will sell faster. If you had any doubts before, this should lay them to rest.Homes staged before listing sell 90% faster

These statistics prove that staging a home before listing is far superior than listing a home before staging. Don’t make the mistake of adapting a wait-and-see attitude. You will get the best results when selling your home if you have it professionally staged before listing.

For more information about having your Los Angeles home staged before listing, contact Michelle at 626-385-8852 or via our Contact Us page.

Post to Twitter

Share

Los Angeles Home Stager Michelle Minch Wins Prestigious Intl. Staging Award

Los Angeles real estate stager Michelle Minch named a 2014 Top 10 Professional Home Stager™ by the Real Estate Staging Association at their International Home Staging Convention.

RESA National Staging AwardPress release via PRWeb:

Pasadena, California (PRWEB) February 28, 2014

Los Angeles home stager, Michelle Minch, President of Moving Mountains Design, was named the Real Estate Staging Association (RESA) 2014 Top 10 Professional Home Stagers™, at the RESA International Stager Conference in Las Vegas, NV. Minch won the 2010 Professional Stager of the Year award. RESA Professional Stager of the Year award recognizes the home stager that demonstrates excellence in home staging, best home staging business practices, a proven track record of ethical conduct and commitment to raising awareness about home staging.

The award was presented at a special awards dinner at the Treasure Island Resort in Las Vegas, NV, during RESA’s annual International Staging Conference. Barbara Corcoran (Shark Tank) was the keynote speaker. Home stagers from the US, Canada, and Europe were in attendance, as were many vendors that service the home staging and real estate industries.

“Being chosen as a Top 10 Professional Home Stager is so gratifying. All my hard work has paid off. I feel honored and privileged to have been chosen by my peers for this honor,” said Minch. “There’s a revolution going on in the real estate industry. Home Buyers are choosing homes that are move-in-ready and staged to perfection. My goal as Top 10 Professional Home Stager is to raise awareness about the value home staging adds to the bottom line, both for the home seller & buyer. Home staging should be an integral part of every home sale.”

In addition to winning 2010 Professional Stager of the Year, Ms. Minch is a past winner of two Chrysalis Awards for Remodeling Excellence: the Western Region Award for Best Whole House Remodel Under $200,000 and the National Award for Best Kitchen Remodel under $40,000. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times Real Estate Section, the Chicago Tribune, Sunset Magazine, Green Builder, Log Home Living, LA Weekly Pasadena Weekly & Los Angeles Times On-Line. In addition, she blogs extensively at Moving Mountains Design Home Staging Blog and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Silk Road Report, an online blog about Chinese Real Estate investment on the West Coast.

About the Real Estate Staging Association:

The Real Estate Staging Association (RESA) is the world’s largest member governed trade association for home stagers. RESA was formed in order to support all professional real estate stagers or home stagers in North America and Europe. RESA is a portal to the home staging industry and is a source of education and business tools focusing on the needs of home stagers. Members have access to up to date information relative to the home staging industry, marketing support services and access to home staging continuing education providers. Click here for more information about the Real Estate Staging Association.

To see the full press release click here.

Post to Twitter

Share

Home Stagers Tips: How To Remove Smoking Odors From Your Home

Today I went to an open house in my Pasadena neighborhood for a condo unit that’s for sale. The condo is in a great neighborhood, in a quiet, well kept condo development. I was impressed with the walk up to the unit so extra points for good exterior appeal.  I opened the front door and WHAM! The smell of old cigarette smoke and nicotine hit me square in the face. I asked the agent if the owners were smokers. She said they were, and the apartment had been fully re-painted and re-carpeted, yet the smell persisted.

Smoking odors, be it from cigarettes, cigars, or pipes is insidious and very difficult to get rid of. It seeps into the smallest cracks and crevices. It saturates upholstery batting, stuffing and cushions. It infiltrates carpet padding. Here’s some home stager’s tips for getting rid of old cigarette smoke and nicotine smells:
Home stagers tip: Getting rid of cigarette smoke odors

  • Get rid of everything “soft” meaning furniture, upholstery, throw pillows, drapery, mattresses, etc. If you can’t put it in the washing machine or send it to the dry cleaner, you’ll never get rid of the smell. Even if you can wash a pillow cover, you will have to get rid of the pillow filler unless you can launder that too.
  • Tear out the carpet and tear out the carpet padding. Don’t replace the carpet without replacing the padding. Wash the bare floor with a product appropriate for the surface. Wash it again.
  • Wash down all painted surfaces with something like TSP which you can purchase at most hardware and paint stores. Don’t forget the ceiling. Follow the instructions on the package carefully so you don’t damage the surface or hurt yourself.
  • Wash all other hard surfaces (linoleum floors, tile, etc.) with a 1 to 3 solution of white vinegar and water (1 cup vinegar to 3 cups water). Test the solution in an inconspicuous area first to make sure it won’t damage the surface. DO NOT use this solution on granite, marble or stone. Use a reputable stone cleaner. Change the solution often so you are not dragging the smell from one surface to another. The vinegar smell will dissipate fairly rapidly, so don’t worry about that. Remember to wash out all cabinets and closets as well.
  • Use the correct Kilz primer to cover all painted surfaces. Your painter or paint store person should be able to direct you to the proper product. If the smell is particularly strong, you may have to use 2 coats of Kilz. Kilz claims to act like a sealer for both the nicotine stains and the odor.
  • Have all the vents and ducts in the house cleaned.
  • Change any HVAC filters (heater and AC).
  • Remove all lightbulbs and either clean them or replace them. Nicotine can collect on light bulbs like every place else, and when a bulb is turned on, it can act like an odor diffuser.

Most air fresheners will only mask the smell temporarily. Same with diffusers.

Please DO NOT USE an “ozone air purifiers” to remove smoking odors. According to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) a government agency, their claims are based upon junk science. Read more about ozone air cleaners or purifiers.

From the EPA site:

Manufacturers and vendors of ozone devices often use misleading terms to describe ozone. Terms such as “energized oxygen” or “pure air” suggest that ozone is a healthy kind of oxygen. Ozone is a toxic gas with vastly different chemical and toxicological properties from oxygen.

While there is no guarantee that the above methods will remove all smoke odors before you put your home on the market, they should go a long way to removing most of them.

This was originally posted in October 2010. It has been updated and more information has been added.

Photo credit: Nirbhao on Flickr.com

Post to Twitter

Share
+Michelle Minch